Tag: ADS-B

PlanePlotter Now Supports RTL2832U Sticks as ADS-B Receivers

We always said that using a RTL2832U DVB-T stick actually works well for ADS-B reception. Especially as an entry level device for the beginning ADS-B hobbyist or some one who is curious about if they could receive ADS-B aircraft traffic in their area. The RTL2832U stick at about $20 is a great way to get some experience with ADS-B before investing in more expensive gear. Our testing has shown while not quite as effective as the commercial ADS-B receivers, the RTL2832U ADS-B setup can come pretty close. With that in mind, Bev from COAA, the maker of PlanePlotter has just recently announced that support for RTL2832U receivers has been added to the PlanePlotter. This also includes support for Multilateration the PlanePlotter uses to estimate the position of an aircraft that is transmitting Mode S reports, but not positional data. To get these features in PlanePlotter, it is recommended that you use the RTL1090 ADS-B windows decoder from Jetvision.de. Here are the details of the announcement from Bev regarding PlanePlotter and RTL2832U sticks from the PlanePlotter Yahoo Group:…

RTL1090 ADS-B Decoder for Windows

Thanks to the folks over at Jetvision.de we have a very nice ADS-B decoder for Windows that works with RTL2832U sticks called RTL1090. Unlike the Ubuntu, GNU Radio, gr-air-modes combination, it’s fast and easy to install under Windows. For those who want to experiment with the ADS-B hobby but were a bit intimidated by the complexity of the software, RTL1090 is for you. The software allows a RTL2832U stick to emulate a Beast ADS-B receiver. Beast Mode is compatible with Plane Plotter and Virtual Radar Server ADS-B software. RTL1090 also will decode Mode A/C for those who may be interested in that. The software is still under development so features may change and improve, but it appears to work extremely well at this time.…

ADS-B Sharing Server on a Stick (or a Pi)

Introduction
Many ADS-B hobbyist like to share data with the public. Their are several sharing services out there that one can use to do this. However, one of the draw backs of sharing data to some hobbyist is having to tie up a large,  power hungry, noisy, and expensive computer to do this. Why not use a small, low power, quiet, cheap computer to do this? Well you can, with either the $35 Raspberry Pi or the $70 MK802. Both units include fanless low power ARM chips to provide the computing power you need in a tiny package. The ARM processors in the MK802 or Raspberry Pi are not very powerful, but they are plenty powerful for ADS-B data sharing. Both systems run modified versions of common Linux distributions that you will need to install. This project is more of a proof of concept and there are probably more details to be worked out depending on the type of ADS-B receiver, how it’s connected to the server (USB or IP), and the data format it sends. The testing was done with a RTL3832u as a receiver with gr-air-modes sending ADS-B data over TCP port 30003 in Kinetics SBS-1 format.…

RTL2832u ADS-B Performance Testing

In an earlier article, I mentioned that the RTL2832u / E4000 does a pretty reputable job receiving ADS-B signals. I thought it would be interesting to see just how well it worked. I used a couple of  Windows tools to analyze the data decoded by gr-air-modes from the RTL2832u stick. The first tool is SBSPlotter, which creates a polar map showing the range and direction of the ADS-B signals you are receiving. This is a nice little tool to help you tweak your antenna or antenna placement for the best performance. SBSPlotter can be downloaded from http://jetvision.de/sbs.shtml. The second tool was BSTChart, that will plot the type of ADS=B messages and number of messages from your receiver. BSTChart can be downloaded here. These programs work fine with gr-air-modes since the server outputs the ADS-B messages in Kinetics SBS-1 format. You just need to give them the IP address and port 30003 of the machine running the gr-air-modes and the RTL2832u server. They may work under Wine on your Linux box, but I did not try it. I just routed the data from my Linux box to a PC.…